Ayelet Gilad

Alpharetta Living, Real Estate and Community


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Swimming Pools: Do They Add Value or Turn Buyers Off?

Sparkling blue water, especially when it’s lit up at night – what’s not to love about a swimming pool in your backyard? If you have one, you may feel blessed. If you don’t, and are considering adding one, hang on a minute.

Who Wants a Pool?

According to Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate, middle-aged buyers with teenagers at home comprise the biggest market segment for homes with swimming pools. This makes sense when you consider how dangerous an unfenced pool is for families with toddlers.

Another segment of homebuyers who may find a pool desirable are younger couples who entertain frequently. There has been a lot of emphasis over the past few years on outdoor entertainment areas, including outdoor kitchens, fire pits, fireplaces and seating areas. A swimming pool frequently figures into these plans.

Location Always Counts

“Location, location, location” may just be a trite real estate mantra, but it is important nonetheless. If you live in Hawaii, Florida or the Southwest, a pool is far more in demand than for homes in Minnesota, Alaska or North Dakota.

Then, drill down your location even further. Even if you live in the desert climate of the Southwest, if there’s a community pool a block away, installing a pool at home may be a waste of money. On the other hand, if your neighbors all have pools, you should probably consider putting one in.

How Big is Your Lot?

Lot size is a huge factor in deciding whether or not to have a swimming pool installed. Remember, if you have a small lot and the pool takes up the entire backyard, you are removing your home from consideration by buyers with small children and buyers who garden or entertain. Pet owners and young families typically want grassy areas where their pets and kids can play safely. Many seniors like to putter in the yard. If there is no room for any backyard activity other than swimming, you narrow the buyer field dramatically.

What is the Home’s Value Right Now?

One of the most important factors to consider when thinking about adding a pool as a home improvement project is to not over-improve for the neighborhood. If you own a modest tract home in a neighborhood of similar homes, a pool may be overkill. The value of your home can only rise to that of the most expensive home in the area.

Owners of luxury homes in higher-priced neighborhoods with roomy backyards that appeal to buyers looking for a certain lifestyle may be able to justify the expense of installing a swimming pool. In fact, if you own a luxury home without a pool, you may lose buyers.

Type and Condition of the Pool

It should probably go without saying: If the pool is in poor condition or dirty, it will not add value to the home. If the pool is outdated, it won’t add value. If the pool hasn’t been maintained, the appraiser may even deduct from the home’s value, according to Tim Page, owner of Appraisals by Page in Spokane, Washington. He suggests that if your pool is of the above-ground variety, it is considered personal property and it won’t factor into the home’s value. Be that as it may, if it is in poor condition it may turn off buyers, so take it down.

Factor in the Ongoing Cost of a Pool

Ongoing home maintenance costs are a turn-off for many buyers, and a pool may be a maintenance nightmare for them. Aside from the cost of pool installation, ongoing maintenance tasks such as heating and cleaning the pool, as well as the ongoing cost of a swimming pool, may be prohibitive to many buyers.

Does a Pool Add Value?

Most real estate agents will tell you that pools do not add value to a home, and for the most part this is true. What value a pool may add is small – typically about 8 percent of the home’s value, according to the National Association of Realtors® National Center for Real Estate Research. The margin of increase is larger for homes in the southern U.S., Florida and Hawaii.

The decision to install a swimming pool should be based on your personal lifestyle and desire, not whether it will add value to the home.

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Is Your Front Door Welcoming?

Creating indoor/outdoor transitions that welcome and complement your home can add to your home’s curb appeal and value. People often think only about the value of their house and what’s going on inside, but your front door is the first impression your visitors get of your home. Make it a good one.

Entries That Welcome

These days, many homeowners in the United States use their garage as their everyday entry to their home. They rarely enter their home the way their guest will, through the front door.

Have you ever been invited to someone’s home and discovered when you got there that you aren’t sure where you were supposed to enter? Or perhaps the front entry is so dark and overgrown that it feels scary and unwelcoming? One of the most important indoor/outdoor transitions at your home is the sequence people experience from the instant they arrive at the curb to the moment they enter through your front door. So, what can you do?

Make it Obvious

Guests should not have to wonder whether they should enter through your front door, a side door, or through the garage. Make the entry you want guests to use obvious by providing a clear path and making it visible from the street. Use containers of plants, lighting, or a wreath on the door to signify the importance of that entry.

Light it Up

Provide adequate outdoor lighting, not just at the front door, but along the path guests will use to walk from the street to your door. This is especially important if there are a number of stairs guests must climb and descend to get to and from your home. Your guests will appreciate a well-lit path, and the chances of someone injuring themselves on the way to your front door will be reduced. There are a wide variety of lighting options available to homeowners. You can choose anything from low-voltage and solar landscape lighting to step lights and LED rope lights that can be imbedded into concrete walls and stair risers.

Make it Safe

As mentioned before, visibility from the street is very important. This goes beyond simply allowing visitors to see the location of the front door. We often think of high fences and gates as mechanisms to keep out intruders, but once someone has breached that barrier, a high fence becomes a hiding place behind which to lurk. Fences and walls can be designed to keep intruders out while still allowing views in. High, solid fences and large evergreen shrubs near entryways should be avoided. Avoid built elements and plantings that block views or create a confined space. Your guests should feel safe when waiting for you to answer your front door.

Welcome!

The act of welcoming your guests does not start when you open your front door; it begins the moment they drive up and park their car at the curb. What does the entry sequence at your front door say about you? Walk across the street and take a look. Walk the path your guests will use several times and think about the experience. What works? What needs to change?

Do you feel welcome?


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What Are The Most Important Parts Of The House To The Average Buyer?

In continuum of our latest post about whether you should remodel your house before you sell,  we thought you should know that an upgraded kitchen and master bedroom will make your house more likable to any buyer! Nonetheless, they will like your house more, just because of that compare to any other houses with outdates kitchen and master bathroom.

Should you  renovate your kitchen and/ or the master bathroom to sell faster and for higher price? Well, in all honesty – it depended. Talk to us and will make sure to go over your specific details, your area and neighborhood.  So before you “over-improve” your house and lose the money, find out what’s suitable for your house by contacting the Ayelet Gilad Home Team today!


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Should You Remodel Prior To Putting Your House On The Market?

Is improving your house will make it sell faster? Will you get more money for a recently renovated house?

Unfortunately, there is not a straight answer to this. It really depends!  Renovations and remodeling can definitely make your home more sellable and compatible to buyers taste. However, while some renovations can benefit the selling process and yield a higher price,  some renovations would only help you sell the house faster without increasing its value. Since cost of renovations and recouping the money when selling the house depends on the area, checkout this table, which summarizes the cost of the project, the resale value and the $ recouped for a variety of projects ranging from deck edition to kitchen remodeling to door replacement.

How can you decide if you should renovate or not? Contact us for your free consultation.